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Click on the pictures above to go to the next section. In the below section, click on the highlighted letters

Revised 29 December 2010

Alphabetical index to the States

Each of these links will take you to a brief history or web page on the subject listed. Within each state, there are additional links that take you to state-specific weblinks. You now have at least a brief history of each state and the county boundary changes. All counties are listed, including some of the discontinued or revised counties. Eventually these will link to other sites with further information. If you click off of the Tin Type Shop to follow some of these links, you will need to use your back arrow to return to this site.

The Tin Type Shop is a genealogy website with connections to the following names: Allen, Bell, Blagg, Campbell, Carr, Cochran, Craven(s), Cunningham, Dillard, Douglas(s), Eastwood, Evans, Ford, Foster, George, Harris, Harrison, Hunter, Keebler, King, Lay, Love, Lutes, O'Rear, Osborn, Russell, Shaffer, Shearman, Vaughn and Wilson. More names will be added as connections are established.

The Pegelow Post follows the genealogical history of Gary Pegelow back through the Mayflower Society connections and over to England with Cromwell. The Pegelow Post is no longer an active portion of this website. When you click on the Pegelow links, you will be directed to another website. This is my husband's line. All questions regarding the Pegelow heritage need to be directed to him.

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa
Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland
Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri
Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey
New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio
Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina
South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont
Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

When researching in the United States, it is helpful to have at least a rudimentary working knowledge of American History. There are many good books written on the subject. Any one of them will do for your purposes. For the total neophyte to U S History, there is a book on history in the Dummies series that gives a general overview. One must give credit to the aborigines who were here first. consider also the explorers of the many nations, each of whom probably has some claim towards the discovery of a part of this great nation. We generally credit Christopher Columbus with the discovery of the "new world", but there are those who dispute this.

For the purposes of the average researcher, our history can be broken into smaller bites so as not to overwhelm the reader. Our history should be broken up, at first, to the discovery, the planting of settlements, the growth of the colonies, the American Revolution and the subsequent formation of the Union. You may wish to go back and review the subsequent wars, including the French and Indian Wars, the King Phillip's War, the War of 1812, and most importantly, the Civil War. Some of the military records of the enlistees in these wars still exist in our National Archives and copies of your ancestor's records may be available. Although not a Mormon myself, I have found that they are more than willing to assist nonmembers of their denomination in family research and many records, not available elsewhere, may be found in their libraries on microfilm and microfische. you should also be aware that many books, not available in your local library, can be borrowed through inter-library loan through your local library. The cost for borrowing the book is nominal, but you cannot remove the book from the library. You must do your research at your local facility and there is a time limit for borrowing the books, after which, they are returned to the original library. The National Genealogical Society also has a lending library arrangement.

A word to new researchers. If you write to another researcher requesting information, be as specific in what you know about the person in question in your letter. Offer to pay for postage and photocopying and always include a stamped, self-addressed envelope if you expect a reply. Research costs a lot of money and it is unfair to expect others to pay for your research expenses or to give you for free, that for which they have themselves paid. It is also a good idea to at least offer to pay for their research time as your request takes time away from their own. For this reason, I found I had to begin charging for researching other people's materials. There are many helpful websites on State research and genealogy information. I have tried to include a few for each state. The following is a brief listing of some websites that cover a more general national level. Be aware that many of these sites charge for membership. I will also include the Family Tree DNA website as this site is also connected to a major DNA project hosted by the National Geographic Magazine. If you have not done your DNA test yet, this is the website I recommend. It is expensive, but the results will help to link us to our past.

NATIONAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY CINDY'S LIST OF GENEALOGICAL SITES
GENEALOGY BANK.COM (NEWSPAPER COLLECTIONS) ANCESTRY.COM
ELLIS ISLAND NATIONAL WOMEN'S HISTORY PROJECT
NATIONAL ARCHIVES FAMILY TREE DNA
U S GENWEB PROJECT LDS TEMPLE RESEARCH SITE
DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION LIBRARY SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION LIBRARY